الاختيار الأمثل للخدمة الشاملة لتنويع الهندسة المعمارية.

Shop Best Domestic Aluminium Windows in Digah House Company

Shop Best Domestic Aluminium Windows in Digah House Company

2021-06-10
Digah Company
50

On this page, you can find quality content focused on domestic aluminium windows. You can also get the latest products and articles that are related to domestic aluminium windows for free. If you have any questions or want to get more information on domestic aluminium windows, please feel free to contact us.

As a provider of domestic aluminium windows, Guangzhou House Empire Construction&Furnishing Co.,Ltd makes effort to ensure product quality. We are completely integrated in terms of using sophisticated tools and equipment to produce. We check our products that comply with all international requirements from the raw material to the finished stage. And we ensure the viability of the products by implementing functional testing and performance testing. We have created our own brand - Digah Company. In the early years, we worked hard, with great determination, to take Digah Company beyond our borders and give it a global dimension. We are proud to have taken this path. When we work together with our customers all over the world to share ideas and develop new solutions, we find opportunities that help make our customers more successful.At Digah Company, we offer our customers who are inclined to do business with us samples for testing and consideration, which will definitely remove their doubts about the quality and performance of domestic aluminium windows.
مقالات مقترحة
The Last Straw: How Much Does the Plastic Straw Ban Really Help  and How Much Does It Hurt?
The Last Straw: How Much Does the Plastic Straw Ban Really Help and How Much Does It Hurt?
Major companies are changing their practices, citywide bans are being implemented, celebrities are making pledges, and the #savetheturtles hashtag is on every social media site I log onto. Ditching plastic drinking straws is suddenly the new trend. Self-described as environmentally minded, I proudly own reusable coffee cups, water bottles, and shopping bags. Knowing this, you could perhaps then imagine that last summer, when I saw posts online encouraging me to stop using plastic straws, I wondered why I had never thought of dropping these pesky plastics from my life. Although not as common as plastic shopping bags, water bottles, or six-pack rings, plastic straws make their way into our oceans alongside these other single-use plastics.Plastics in our oceans are incredibly detrimental for ocean life: they cause harm from the bottom of the food web all the way to the top. Photos of the great pacific garbage patch, of penguins and turtles caught in soda-can rings, or of the plastic-packed stomach-contents of deceased fish and birds have all been circulated in the past. The latest of these grim images to go viral has caused quite a splash. Not exactly an image but rather a devastating video posted online shows marine biologists removing a straw wedged in the nostril of a turtle. The video's virility has turned this turtle into the poster child of a new movement to ban plastic straws.Following the popularity of this video, campaigns to #stopsucking and the United Nations's war on plastic to create #cleanseas, amongst others, have gained momentum to ensure that #thefuturedoesntsuck. The cause has spread rapidly on social media thanks to these hashtags and others such as #savetheturtles. In line with these campaigns, in July 2018, the city of Seattle became the first major city to announce a citywide ban on single-use plastic straws and utensils. Following suit, in December 2018, European Union leaders signed a provisional agreement to ban ten different single-use plastic products. In North America, the momentum has continued with many major companies such as the Walt Disney Company, Starbucks, and Alaska Airlines eliminating plastic straws from their services.These bans and boycotts are not without opposition, perhaps most vocally from those advocating for people with disabilities and limited mobility. For these people, straws allow the safe consumption of liquids without aid, thus bolstering independence. Alternatives such as metal, glass, silicone or compostable straws each have their own drawbacks. Paper straws are not resilient enough, and silicone straws are not flexible enough. Other alternatives, such as metal and glass, conduct temperature, making them unsafe for people who are required to rely upon them. As one advocate told NPR, "Disabled people have to find ways to navigate through the world because they know it was not made for us. If someone says, 'This does not work for me,' it's because they've tried everything else." Although for many people forgoing straws is an easy way to reduce plastic use, for others they are a necessity. It is crucial that policy makers gain input from those groups that would be most impacted before implementing new policies that would completely ban a necessity on which some such groups depend.However, in all of this, the question that begs to be asked is: Will banning straws actually do anything for our oceans? One report suggests that straws constitute only seven percent of our plastic waste, but advocates of the bans point out that, while they are not the biggest contributor, straws are a "playful" gateway to get people talking about and changing their plastic usage habits.It is not just soda-can-rings and straws that hurt wildlife; the biggest concern of plastics in our oceans is the accumulation of microplastics. As plastic degrades and breaks up into smaller and smaller fragments, it is consumed and works its way through the food chain, ending up in the fish and shellfish consumed by humans. With almost half of the earth's population relying on seafood as a source of animal protein, the growing evidence of microplastic toxicity and epidemiology has provoked concern about the consequences our plastic use has on our own health.Straws, cups, and bags are often perceived as free. One of the keys to reducing consumption is helping people to understand that these plastics do have a real cost and that the cost is both to the environment and human health. Campaigns against straw usage illustrate the growing concern many have about the consequences of single plastic use.Straws are not the first single-use plastics to face the wrath of bans and boycotts. Bangladesh banned plastic bags in 2002 after they were found to have choked the nation's drainage systems. Following in the footsteps of Bangladesh, Ireland implemented a tax on plastic bags in 2008. The money from these taxes goes directly to the ministry of the environment for clean-up projects. For a country where it was once commonplace to see plastic bags littering the landscape, this tax has helped change the mindset of Ireland's population and has consequently reduced single plastic consumption. In December 2018, New Zealand's Prime Minister announced plans to phase out single-use plastic bags by July 2019, with hefty fines for retailers that do not comply. As noted in a report from the United Nations, New Zealand is just the latest country to join the ranks of over sixty countries worldwide who have introduced bans and levies on single-use plastics. Absent from this list, however, is the United States.Plastic bag bans are implemented regionally in some parts of the United States, but this trend has been met with unfavorable reactions from other municipalities. In 2016, Michigan went as far as passing a law to prohibit local governments from banning, regulating, or imposing fees on the use of plastic bags. Supporters of this law state that it will protect businesses from having to comply with additional regulations and avoid any added complexities to day-to-day business.However, its neighboring state did the opposite. On March 6, 2019, Illinois's Senate Revenue Committee passed a proposal for a statewide plastic bag tax. This is not surprising considering that Chicago, the largest city in Illinois, has enforced its own plastic bag tax since February 2017. Only a month after implementation, the number of Chicago shoppers using disposable bags decreased from 82 percent to 48 percent. The effectiveness of this tax is consistent with the concept of loss aversion, where an individual will experience a loss more strongly that they do a gain. A ten-cent tax on plastic bags is more salient than an outright ban as customers may not notice if a store swaps the types of bags they give out, but they will definitely notice when something they previously received for free comes at a price. When plastic use habits suddenly incur a monetary cost, it makes sense to rethink them.With the momentum building behind the call to ban straws in the US, it is only a matter of time before the public attention is turned towards all other single-use plastics. Bans and boycotts are an effective means to reduce the use of single-use plastics and also encourage other pro-environmental actions. Bans act as an external motivator by removing choice, but the formation of additional long-lasting pro-environmental habits is largely reliant upon internal motivators or social pressures. A bigger conversation is required to reduce the demand for plastic. Banning one type of single-use plastic is not going to magically reduce overall demand, but it will get the general public, policy makers and scientists thinking about this issue.The quantity of plastic entering our oceans can be reduced through policy change but, at least for now, change must start with the behavior of individuals. I encourage you to reflect upon your responsibility to protect both the environment and the health of the oceans and human populations alike. If you have no reason for single plastic use other than convenience, then I encourage you to reduce your usage. Refuse single-use plastics when they are not a necessity, use reusable alternatives, recycle any plastics you do use, and, the next time you reach for a straw for your iced coffee, remember the turtles.Where can I buy paper wrapped plastic straws?You can ask for a handful from a local restaraunt that distributes them. Just request for some but they might or might not ask you to pay a small fee for the large amount
How to Use Your Blog As a Lead Magnet to Understand Customers
How to Use Your Blog As a Lead Magnet to Understand Customers
What is a lead magnet? According to Digital Marketer, it is an irresistible bribe offering a specific chunk of value to a prospect in exchange for their contact information. Im going to add to that definition a lead magnet is a bribe so awesome that it eventually compels the prospect to pull out their credit card to work with you.Can your businesss blog serve as your lead magnet?Yes!And you can you use your blog not only to understand your customers, but also to convince them that youre so in tune with what they need, they will jump at the chance to give you their contact information (and eventually their business). The benefits of starting a blogIf youre not blogging for your business, you should certainly start one and commit to it. Its not nearly as hard as you might think. In fact, I wrote a full post detailing how to start a blog in less time than it takes to order a pizza. You might be asking yourself, why even bother with starting a blog? Here are just a few of the benefits of doing it for your business:Blogging can be great for SEO.The Google LOVES to see that you are creating valuable content for your prospects, and sometimes rewards you by pushing you up in the search results (which, P.S., could mean more eyes on your business).Blogging sets you up as a subject-matter expert. Your blog gives you the chance to show your prospects that you know your stuff.It boosts your know, like and trust factors.Youre content is establishing that youre an expert, but now you have to get people to like and trust you. Blogging is like courting your prospect. As they read more of your content, they will get to know you better, and as a result theyll be more likely to like and trust you enough to buy from you.I could go on with blogging benefits. But this post is about using your blog as a lead magnet so lets dive into that!Your blog IS a lead magnetYou want to get a better read on your customers? Blogging is a great way because posts you write will help to tell you whats resonating with them and what isnt.For example, if you have a post on your website that is blowing up with pageviews a traffic metric you can get through Google Analytics odds are your customers are seriously digging it. You can also use a social media measurement tool to track how many shares your posts are getting on the social platforms where your business is active. This gives you further insight into whether or not your prospects like your blog content enough to tell their friends and followers it.Editors note: Want some help managing your businesss social media accounts? The experts on GoDaddys Social Media Management team will help you see whats working including how many likes, shares or impressions each post gets so you can use that info to improve your content. On the other hand, if you have posts that are stagnate or not being shared anywhere, one of two things could be at play:Your prospects arent feeling it.You might not be reaching your true ideal customers (i.e., they arent even aware your posts or smarts exist!)Their comments will also tell you more about how to serve them better. Keep an eye on their comments and shares. Questions that come up and other feedback related to your posts could turn into more content for your blog and help you to write better copy for your sales pages.Finding out which posts are getting the most attentionLink Tally is one website that will tell you how many times your link was shared on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus and LinkedIn regardless of your share buttons. As mentioned above, you should also hook up your blog to an analytics tool to keep track of pageviews, the demographics of your website visitors and other useful info. You might find that your true fans arent young women, but in fact middle-aged men. (Hey, it could happen!)Meet copywriter Lauren Van MullemLauren Van Mullem is a truly spectacular copywriter and content strategist for coaches based in California. Her blog, after it was revised and reborn, has brought clients to her almost like bees to honey. I asked her to tell me a little bit about how she uses her blog as a lead magnet to entice customers to work with her, and how to understand what they are looking for in a writer. Here are the golden nuggets she shared with me:Theres this thing called Content Shock and its basically that there is so much content out there that not even high quality content stands out. At best, high quality gives you parity. To stand out and actually reach your ideal audience, you have to:Hyperfocus your blog on topics that best serve customers.Always be both genuinely helpful and actionable (for heavens sake, cut the fluff).Make it personal.And that last point is the most important. Because all of the content writers in the world cant reproduce you, your personality, your experience or your perspective. Ive heard this called your unfair advantage something that no one else can copy or steal. Find that, and find what your audience needs most. Make that your content sweet spot. Transitioning from simple content hub to full-on lead magnetAgain Lauren had some serious truth bombs to offer here:The best thing you can do for your business is to identify (and verify) your ideal customer. So dont just say, My ideal customer is a woman between 35 and 44, married with kids, who wants to renovate her bathroom.Go out there and talk to women between the ages of 35 and 44 who are married with kids who express interest in renovating their bathrooms. See if they really do need what you offer.Ask them what they wish they had and what theyd realistically want to pay for it. Too many times, business owners assume they know their ideal customers, when theyre really slightly off target. That gums up the works in every aspect of marketing.Once you have that clarity (and hopefully a dozen or so confirmed ideal customers) ask them, personally (incentivize if you have to), to answer a short survey about what type of content theyd be most interested in, what theyd find most helpful.The best content doesnt come out of business owners or marketers sitting down to brainstorm. It comes directly from listening to your customers. Really, its so much easier that way!Noelle Hartt is another copywriter I follow, and she added this to Laurens brilliance:One of the best pieces of advice I can offer to business owners unsure of what to blog about is to start creating content based on existing customers frequently asked questions.I did this for one of my clients a luxury real estate agent often asked about the different private schools in his area. We decided to publish a blog post with information about all the local private schools, what makes them unique and how to apply, and now he has an article he can share with his social media followers and any other prospects he encounters that shows off his knowledge on the subject.Overwhelmed yet? Dont be! Lets recap!You should be blogging, but you shouldnt just blog any old thing. To truly speak to your customers, tell them what they want to know. Give them the knowledge that they need that tells them, Hey! This business can fix the EXACT problem I have.As you create content, gauge reactions. See whats poppin and whats falling flat. The things that are getting the most attention are literally telling you that potential customers want to know this stuff. Then, you can give them more of it. For the things that are falling flat, you can either simply stop creating that type of content, or ask your current customers why they didnt jive with the posts. Engage with your customers and prospects to learn more of what they want to know.Use your blog as the avenue to get the conversation started, and to keep it going. Ask prospects for their email address and/or contact information. Once youve got them hooked into reading the entire post, ask for their deets. If not that, at least include some kind of call-to-action to keep the conversation moving along. Even after they have worked with you, keep chatting with them. Ask what worked and what didnt. Its also a good idea to ask what they wish they had known before working with you if anything.By continuing the dialogue, you can get a deeper understanding of how to work with them again in the future. Youll also learn how you can expedite the process of generating new leads that turn into customers.Originally published at Garage RELATED QUESTION Why did the Challenger solid rocket booster need seals? Why were six joints welded but the last joint was a non welded rubber seal design? Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster - Wikipedia I believe that all seven motor segments of the booster were sealed with pairs (later, three) O-ring seals. None were welded. The boosters were recovered and used many times over; having non welded parts aided in the shipment, disassembly and inspection and re-use of the booster parts. The failure of the Challenger boosters was caused by cold weather and incomplete sealing when the o-rings were stiffer and harder and did not seal. Hot gasses escaped the seals and damaged the space shuttle.
Why It Takes Decades to Produce a New Solar Material
Why It Takes Decades to Produce a New Solar Material
The solar industry is abuzz over a relative newcomer that burst onto the scene less than a decade ago and has risen rapidly through the ranks. The all-star rookie has also been published in high-impact academic journals in the last few years, but it is not a newly minted professor or a hot solar startup. It's a material known as perovskite.Materials scientists started testing perovskite's sun-capturing qualities in the 2000s, and by 2009, a team lead by Tsutomu Miyasaka from Toin University of Yokohama in Japan had produced a solar cell that converted 3.8% of the sun's light into electricity, a respectable amount for such a new material. Just last fall, another group lead by Henry Snaith from the University of Oxford published a breakthrough-their perovskite solar cells were 15.4% efficient.In a world where gains of fractions of a percent are lauded, such a leap was unprecedented. "Very few come in out of the cold and have a 15% conversion efficiency." says David Ginley, a research fellow at the National Renewably Energy Laboratory."It's exciting," says Michael McGehee, a professor of materials science at Stanford University. "It's a new material with a lot of potential."That excitement is evident in recent news coverage. Even Nature , a well-respected academic journal, hailed Snaith as one of the 2013's "ten people who mattered." "This year, Snaith amazed materials researchers by massively boosting the efficiency of solar cells made with perovskite semiconductors," they wrote.Those plaudits come with a small catch-they tacitly presume that perovskite will continue its rapid ascent. If it does, the material truly could be revolutionary. Currently, photovoltaics cost between $2 and $5 per watt depending on the scale of the installation. That's significantly lower than just five years ago, though it's still not competitive with coal or natural gas. But if perovskite continues to gain efficiency, it could tilt the playing field solidly in favor of solar power.The target is 25% efficiency. Very few types of cells exceed that goal, and even fewer are commercially available currently. "A lot of people think that you need the efficiency of the cells to be up near 25% because if the efficiency is lower, you need a larger area to get the power, and the larger area, the more the installation costs are," McGehee says. Perovskite made waves with how quickly it broke 15% efficiency, and unspoken assumption in many articles is that the material could breach 25% in a matter of years, not decades.Snaith, whose team achieved the recent perovskite milestone, seems convinced that perovskite already has commercial potential. He has founded a company that's striving to produce perovskite solar cells in mass quantity, which he says will happen in "three to five years."Snaith's compressed timeline mirrors the great strides perovskite has taken as a photovoltaic material. But the road from the laboratory to the rooftop can be filled with unexpected speed bumps, something known all too well by researchers and manufacturers of copper indium gallium selenide, or CIGS, a photovoltaic material that's just recently become available on the market. In fact, the story of CIGS could be viewed as a cautionary tale, one that might temper some of the excitement surrounding perovskite.CIGS began life as CIS, or copper indium selenide. It, too, is a semiconductor and was originally discovered in 1953 by Harry Hahn and his team at the University of Heidelberg. They published their discovery in Zeitschrift für anorganische und allgemeine Chemie , a German-language chemistry journal. It was not uncommon at the time for chemists to publish in German, though that may have been partly why it was overlooked as a photovoltaic until 1974 when Sigurd Wagner, a young Austrian scientist and a fresh face at Bell Labs, and his team published an article on how his lab-grown crystals that could capture the sun's rays.CIS crystals were expensive and proved difficult to grow, though, which was part of the reason why Larry Kazmerski, then a professor at the University of Maine, started searching for a better technique. It did not take him long. Shortly after Wagner's first paper came out, Kazmerski told colleagues how he deposited CIS in a thin-film on a piece of glass. His first cells were between 4-5% efficient.It was a promising development, but work on CIS was only one part of a larger government investment in solar power. In the 1970s, the National Science Foundation was directing large investments in solar power research for the U.S. government. Much of the money was going toward developing silicon-based solar cells. "Silicon, they knew, would do well eventually. That was the known semiconductor," says Kannan Ramanathan, head of the CIGS team at the NREL. "Yet they wanted to divest, take risks, and nurture thin films."Work on CIS trundled along until 1981, when Boeing scientists Reid Mickelsen and Wen Chen announced at a conference in Orlando, Florida, that they had doubled Kazmerski's efficiency by depositing the material in a new way. Thin-films had arrived.Though silicon remained the favored material, a handful of companies grew interested in thin-film cells and CIS in particular. They wagered that if they could get the chemistry right, thin-film cells would be vastly cheaper to produce than silicon cells, which had to be grown as crystals. Plus, CIS could be deposited on inexpensive glass, reducing weight and materials costs. For Boeing, which used solar cells on spacecraft, lightweight panels would translate into cheaper launch costs.Meanwhile, the aerospace company's continued investment was yielding dividends. Chen and another colleague, John Stewart, figured out in the late-1980s that they could substitute gallium for some of the indium, further raising the efficiency. (That was what put the G in CIGS.)Earlier that decade, oil company Arco had also begun exploring CIS and other thin-film technologies. During the energy crisis in 1979, the company had become a serious player in the nascent solar power industry. After throwing its weight behind CIS research, it quickly developed an alternative to Boeing's production technique. It was not quite as efficient, but was considered easier to manufacture. By 1988, the Southern California-based Arco Solar produced a four-square-foot module with 11% efficiency. That same year, they offered to permanently light the Hollywood sign using solar power.Despite the bravado, things were not going well for the Arco Solar pioneer. Development problems plagued the run-up to production, frustrating its parent company. Plus, the solar power market was not growing as quickly as they had hoped. Looking to cut costs, Arco sold its solar division to Siemens in 1989.Boeing had also lost interest, and left their work to NREL. Researchers in academia and industry had to go back to the drawing board in an attempt to resolve the issues that plagued previous manufacturing efforts. But without the major players, the material that had shown so much promise in the 1970s and 1980s stumbled. It would be almost 10 years before the CIGS industry would recover.Out from the ShadowsBy the late 1990s, Siemens was feeling confident in its progress on CIGS and spooled up a pilot production line. The results of an early run were tested at NREL and scored higher than 10% efficiency. They were the first thin-film photovoltaics made outside of a lab to reach that landmark. But just as Arco had dropped its solar division after it made the 11% module, Siemens started looking for a buyer for the California-based division shortly thereafter. It eventually ended up with another oil company, Shell. (The division ended up being a hot potato; Shell would only own it for four years before selling it to Germany-based Solar World in 2006.)The 2000s could have been another lost decade for CIGS, but then, in 2003, Germany began offering generous subsidies on solar power. That encouraged a number of universities and small companies to jump in the game, who, along with NREL, would end up carrying the torch when, a few years later, Shell "walked away" from their solar division, Ramanathan says.The handful of smaller companies kept at it, encouraged by government subsidies and an influx of venture capital, fine-tuning their materials and lowering their production costs. Then, as so many times before, they ran into a series of unexpected problems. While many companies had become adept at producing cells in the lab, they could not replicate that success on a large scale. Some of these delays were blamed on an incomplete scientific understanding of the CIGS material. William N. Shafarman, a professor at the University of Delaware, and Lars Stolt, a professor at Uppsala University, wrote in 2003 that the "lack of a science base has been perhaps the biggest hindrance to the maturation of Cu(InGa)Se 2 solar cell technology as most of the progress has been empirical." At many companies, the cart had gotten in front of the horse. Between 2005-2007, 70% of thin-film panels failed, more than double the failures for 1997-2005. They had to go back to the drawing board, again.Meanwhile, manufacturers also had to perfect how the cells would be packaged and connected. Each wire, sheet of glass, and piece of aluminum had to be tested for durability and reliability. They had to simulate everything from snafus that might take place during installation to 20 years of heat and moisture. Thanks to accelerated testing, the process does not take 20 years, but it can still take many months to several years.Bert Haskell, the CTO at Pecan Street, oversaw these tests in an earlier job as director of product development at Heliovolt, an Austin, Texas-based CIGS company. There, he and his team would subject completed panels to a grueling regimen of abuse. They would yank on connecting cables, drop one-and-a-half-pound ball bearings onto the glass, and fire chunks of ice at the panels at 50 mph. They would subject them to high humidity and drastic fluctuations in temperature. They would bake them and they would freeze them. "Those tests, you might run those for 90 days or six months before you get results back," Haskell says. It was quicker than waiting 20 years, but it was not instantaneous.Add it all up, and you quickly realize that just testing the non-photovoltaic part of the module took several years. Some tests could occur in parallel with work on the CIGS cells themselves, but in the end, the entire package still had to be tested and certified.It was not until the mid-2000s that CIGS-based solar panels began to trickle into the market, more than 30 years after the material's initial discovery as a photovoltaic. Today, CIGS cells remain costly relative to silicon cells and have captured just a few percent of the market. The future could still be bright, but it will require many more years of sustained funding, research and development.Judging by the challenges CIGS confronted, it's likely that perovskite solar cells have a long road in front of them. Though the material has shown great promise, moving out of the lab and into production is not the same as producing high-efficiency cells in the lab. It takes time. "The development time for most technologies is 20 to 30 years," says Ginley, the NREL scientist."Haksell agrees. "When a scientist discovers a new material in the lab that has some kind of unique property, going from that to the point where it's applied in a useful product, it just takes a long time." (I followed up with Snaith regarding his three-to-five-year commercial timeline for perovskite solar cells, but have not heard back.)Perovskite's biggest stumbling block could be water. While most solar cells do not react well to water, perovskite's current formulation is an ionic salt, which means it's highly susceptible to water damage, both McGehee and Ginley tell me. Solar manufacturers work hard to keep their products sealed, but water has a tendency to work its way into the smallest of gaps, including those cracks that happen during installation or any of the many heating and cooling cycles solar panels endure. Reformulating the material while keeping the basic chemical structure could reduce the potential for water damage, but that would require years more research."There's still a lot of questions that need to be answered," McGehee says of perovskite. "It is exciting and I do not want to take away from it in any way, but we still need to have a wait and see attitude before we will know if this is going to be a commercial success."Solar system with both grid tie-in and backup power without battery?A Great Big Switch is simplicity itself. You need any Siemens subpanel of 12 spaces or more, and the ECSBPK01 interlock ($25) and two 2-pole breakers. A 60A from your main panel and a whatever-A from your off-grid source.You leave 2 rows empty for style points, then below that you fit the breakers for the circuits you wish to be capable of functioning on alternate power. You can have 36 of those (32 if you want to keep those style points) and if that is not enough, feed a sub-sub-panel.Throw the 2 top breakers to the right, you are on utility. Throw the 2 top breakers to the left, you are on ???. Part 1: The above. Part 2: ??? Part 3: ProfitCan we do this thing totally batteryless? I seriously doubt it. Here's why. Your freezer starts up, and for a few milliseconds it's going to pull LRA of about, say, 3000 watts. And it expects this in AC power, and so you have an inverter behind an MPPT controller. The inverter goes "OK, that's 25A, hey solar system, I need 125A" and the solar system goes "Unable". Voltage plunges toward zero, which means inverter output voltage plunges toward zero, and the freezer sits there at LRA unable to start. And this continues indefinitely until ??? some safety system in the inverter kicks in and shuts off the inverter. Why did not this work? You have 5000W of solar panel. Yes, if it's aimed directly square on to the sun. At the angle it's at, at the angle of the sun, 3000 is the best you could do, but it's also cloudy. In fact your panel has been passing in and out of clouds all day, bouncing practical output between 500 and 3000. So you need at least an ultra-capacitor to get loads started, and really it should be enough of a battery so the freezer can run a normal cycle without emptying the ultracaps in 5 seconds because a cloud rolled over. These are not good failure modes for either the inverter or the freezer. Obviously what you are afraid of is a $5000 battery bill, and then, the recurring $5000 battery bill if PV batteries are anything like car batteries. Some are, some are not . But the size of the battery is variable. It's all about sizing, really. You need the battery to carry you through the stuff you do not expect - like clouds. So it can be quite a small battery pack, as small as $100 on the low side. If you do not want to gird up for full fridge lights Roku router TV for 3 days straight with little usable sun, you do not have to. If you ever change your mind you can always add battery capacity. You may imagine solar is a steady-state source, but that's not really true. See if you can get a second-by-second readout of someone's solar system. They are all over the map on days with any clouds at all. Again, batteries make that moot for in-and-out-of-clouds days. But do not overestimate their generating ability during deep clouds. Storm clouds can be quite dark - yesterday I was working by daylight and suddenly it simply became too dark to work - a big storm rolled through. And of course snow obscures the panel totally. (except Solyndra which had a very slick answer to that, but nobody cared.) You could wake up and find the panel covered in ice from an ice storm that also knocked out your power. (It's too cold; the ice does not chisel off without risk of panel damage). So I think you are laying an assumption that solar power will always be ample during a power outage. I am not sure of that at all, but I am from the rust belt - power outages usually happened in winter storms, where you would not have the solarization to make a panel very productive, first because of clouds/snow/ice, and second because it's winter in the first place. You can also top up battery capacity with a generator if you have long sunless runs.
En Partenariat Avec La RATP, Zoov Met En Place Un Dispositif Spcial Pour Se Dplacer En Vlo Lectrique
En Partenariat Avec La RATP, Zoov Met En Place Un Dispositif Spcial Pour Se Dplacer En Vlo Lectrique
Un mouvement massif de grve va toucher la rgion parisienne et la France entire partir du 5 dcembre. La solution de vlos lectriques en libre-service Zoov a t slectionne par la RATP pour fournir un service renforc aux usagers ds le lancement de la grve en rgion parisienne. A partir du 5 dcembre, la flotte de vlos Zoov sera renforce et des offres tarifaires spciales sont proposes pour permettre un maximum de personnes de se dplacer le long du tronon sud du RER B, entre Bourg-la-Reine et Saint-Rmy-ls-Chevreuse. Offrir un mode de transport rapide et efficace un maximum dusagersA lapproche de la grve, la RATP a souhait sassocier plusieurs solutions de mobilit afin de permettre aux usagers de continuer se dplacer en rgion parisienne. Au sud du Grand Paris, Zoov est la seule solution de vlos lectriques en libre-service choisie par le groupe de transport et un dispositif renforc sera mis en place ds le 5 dcembre.Les vlos lectriques en libre-service Zoov, dj implants entre Massy et Gif-sur-Yvette et utilisables grce une application smartphone, seront accessibles en grand nombre sur un primtre plus large allant de Bourg-la-Reine dans les Hauts-de-Seine Saint-Rmy-ls-Chevreuse dans les Yvelines. Les vlos seront disposs de faon stratgique aux gares RER et proximit des sites les plus frquents (siges dentreprises, campus tudiants et centres-villes). Ils constitueront une alternative efficace au RER B, aux lignes de bus concernes par la grve, et surtout la voiture un moment o les infrastructures routires atteindront un niveau de saturation exceptionnel. En complment de ce dispositif renforc, Zoov propose deux offres tarifaires spciales. Grand public : 15 minutes offertes sur 2 trajets avec le code RATPZOOVEn renseignant le code RATPZOOV dans lapplication Zoov, les utilisateurs ne paieront que 1 (frais de dverrouillage du vlo) dans la limite de 15 minutes dutilisation du service. Au-del des 15 minutes gratuites, une tarification de 0,15 par minute sapplique.Entreprises : 150 minutes gratuites se partager entre collguesGrce cette offre, les collaborateurs ne paient leurs trajets que 0,90 (frais de dverrouillage entreprise) sous rserve dun solde de minutes gratuites suffisant au moment du trajet. Par souci dquit, la gratuit est limite 15 minutes par trajet. Au-del de ce temps ou si le solde de minutes gratuites est puis, la tarification de 0,15 par minute sapplique. Les entreprises souhaitant faire bnficier leurs collaborateurs de cette offre gratuite sont pries de contacter Zoov ladresse sales@zoov. eu. Comment utiliser les vlos lectriques en libre-service Zoov ?Grce lapplication Zoov et la golocalisation, les utilisateurs peuvent trouver, rserver et dverrouiller un vlo lectrique proximit toute heure de la journe. Linstallation de lapplication est gratuite et les utilisateurs sont facturs en fonction du temps pass utiliser le service.A louverture de lapplication, la saisie de la destination permet lutilisateur de connatre une estimation de la dure et du prix du trajet. Une fois le vlo dverrouill grce au scan du QR code situ sur le vlo, le guidage GPS permet de se rendre destination en scurit, sur litinraire le plus cyclable. larrive, lutilisateur gare son vlo Zoov dans lune des stations ultra-compactes installes sur le territoire ou hors station, idalement dans un parking vlos, avant de mettre fin son trajet en un clic.Liste complte des villes desservies pendant la grve :Hauts-de-Seine : Le Plessis-Robinson, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Sceaux, Bourg-la-Reine, AntonyEssonne : Verrires-le-Buisson, Massy, Palaiseau, Villebon-sur-Yvette, Orsay, Bures-sur-Yvette, Gif-sur-Yvette, Saclay, Saint-Aubin, Vauhallan, IgnyYvelines : Saint-Rmy-ls-Chevreuse, Jouy-en-JosasDispositif spcial grve aux gares RER suivantes :Bourg-la-Reine, Sceaux, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Robinson, Parc de Sceaux, La Croix de Berny, Antony, Fontaine-Michalon, Les Baconnets, Massy-Verrires, Massy-Palaiseau, Palaiseau, Palaiseau-Villebon, Lozre, Le Guichet, Orsay-Ville, Bures-sur-Yvette, La Hacquinire, Gif-sur-Yvette, Courcelle-sur-Yvette, Saint-Rmy-ls-ChevreusePour plus dinformations sur Zoov : zoov. euPour en savoir plus sur loffre de Zoov pour les entreprises : en savoir plus sur loffre de Zoov pour les collectivits : la communaut Zoov sur les rseaux sociauxFacebook | Twitter | Instagram | LinkedIn.
لايوجد بيانات
Contact Us
ترك رسالة
We welcome custom designs and ideas and is able to cater to the specific requirements. for more information, please visit the website or contact us directly with questions or inquiries.
قوانغتشو
البيت الإمبراطورية البناء &تأثيث المحدودة
لايوجد بيانات
الاشتراك في Newsletterus
حقوق النشر © 2018 Guangzhou House Empire Construction &شركة تأثيث المحدودة | جميع الحقوق محفوظة تصميم www.digahousing.com | Sitemapsia